Tag : Nursing Agency

RCN Nurse of the Year

Taurai Matare has been named RCN Nurse of the Year 2019 for her innovative work in transforming her unit, its care pathways and workforce over 14 years. The matron for ophthalmology at Whipps Cross University Hospital, received the accolade at the RCNi Nurse Awards 2019. Ms Matare, an advanced nurse practitioner, was recognised in part for her role in achieving a zero nurse vacancy rate in eye theatres at the hospital, as well as zero complaints in 2018. The Care Quality Commission has described the theatres as the ‘gold star’ of Whipps Cross. In addition, 80% of the trust’s ophthalmology staff would recommend the unit as a place to work. Ms Matare was named as the overall winner, having earlier won the Leadership category at the awards. On being named RCN Nurse of the Year, Ms Matare said: ‘I have been a nurse for over 25 years, and to be recognised in this way for me is the pinnacle of my career.’

Taxi drivers take care home residents on free day trip

Residents and staff at a Bath care home were treated to a free taxi ride to a nearby farm as part of a fun day out. Taxi driver Paul Roles, a prominent figure around Bath, got in touch with Winfield Lodge Residential care home with the idea of giving its residents a day to remember. After Mr Roles acquired the help of fellow cabbies, Mike Bean and Stephen Lasota. Thanks to the taxi drivers, care home residents and staff were driven to Bath City Farm, and enjoyed a couple of hours of seeing the farm animals and a spot of tea and cake too.

Bournemouth care home rated as one of the best in England

LIGHTWEIGHT frying pans and a mobile garden are just two of the innovations that have helped a Bournemouth care home become one of only four in the UK to be rated as Outstanding in all areas. Inspectors from the Care Quality Commission made an unannounced visit to Bupa Queensmount and noted that: “An outstandingly caring culture was promoted at every level. Without exception everything the service did was to enhance the lives of the people living there and their families.” Among the innovations staff devised for their residents was a mobile garden so that those who were confined to bed could still enjoy a little gardening. The report also praised activities at the home, stating how they were tailored around residents’ personal interests and people were encouraged to get involved with daily tasks to help them feel valued.

Gin declared the key to long-life by 102-year-old care home resident

A RESIDENT at a care home in Basingstoke has celebrated a milestone birthday. Ellen ‘Nellie’ Barton, who lives in Barchester Healthcare-run St Thomas Care Home, was joined by friends and relatives for her 102nd birthday. Daughter Jean said: “Nellie is and has been a fantastic mother, sister, auntie, grandmother and friend to so many over the past 102 years, and it’s wonderful to be with her on this very special day to say just how proud she makes us feel.” The secret to a long life is kindness to others, as well as gin, according to Nellie.

Student Nurses can be supervised in practice by Nursing Associates

Allowing Nursing Associates to act as ‘Practice Supervisors’ will ensure student nurses are better supported. Recent changes to the Nursing and Midwifery Council’s (NMC) educational standards mean that any registered healthcare professional, including registered nursing associates, can act as a practice supervisor for student nurses. Practice supervisors will supervise students on placements, create tailored and inclusive learning experiences, provide feedback and contribute to recommendations for progression. According to the NMC, there will be no formal qualification for practice supervisors.

Work started on life-size Lancaster Bomber on Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire border

Work has started to build a life-size model of a Lancaster Bomber on the Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire border which campaigners hope will become a national landmark rivalling the Angel of the North. The steel replica of the iconic bomber will be built on high ground off the A46 at Norton Disney, in Lincolnshire, in a spot campaigners say will be seen by 34,000 motorists each day. Lincolnshire is known as “bomber county” because of the number of military airfields it had during the Second World War.

Picture Credit: https://pixabay.com/photos/lancaster-bomber-aircraft-airplane-953196/

Hospital ward opens cinema for patients with memory problems

Hull Royal Infirmary has opened a £7,000 cinema showing footage of Yorkshire throughout the decades to help patients with memory problems. The film booth complete with cinema seats and a giant screen has been set up in the middle of Ward 80 to help people reminisce about their past and share memories of growing up in the city. Ward 80 is the Progression to Discharge Unit where patients recovering from recent illness spend time recuperating before they are discharged home with support or to a care home. The cinema helps to keep people mobile, encouraging them to move around the ward to prevent muscle wastage and get back into a more normal routine following a hospital stay.

Nottingham hospitals need more nurses following national shortage

Nurses are being encouraged to apply for jobs at Nottingham’s hospitals following the new emergency department expansion. A special event was held at the Queen’s Medical Centre on Monday, January 14, to encourage registered nurses in Nottinghamshire to consider working at local hospitals. NUH employs around 5,000 registered nurses, midwives and theatre practitioners but in November it had 350 vacant positions, which is around 11 percent of the nursing workforce.

Surprise for 12-year-old carer when his Chelsea FC heroes turned up to give him an award

A young carer from Camberley got the surprise of his life when a bunch of his Chelsea FC heroes turned up to give him a richly deserved award. Star defender and Brazilian international David Luiz presented Edward Pearce, who is just 12, a Life After Stroke Carers Award carer’s award on behalf of the Stroke Association. Edward was nominated for the gong by his dad Andy, who suffered a severe stroke in 2013. Young Edward made the brave decision to become his primary carer and cooks, cleans and completes the housework before attending school. “It was a privilege for me to present the award to such an inspirational young man, said Luiz. As footballers we get to spread a lot of happiness, but these people are the real heroes. Edward is an amazing person and to hear his dad speak about the help he provides was very touching. He is a very deserving winner of a special award.”

A new way of caring for the elderly with dementia

Anja, who is in her 80s, says she has lived here for one hour. In fact, it has been almost a year. Like all of her neighbours, she has severe dementia. But if she is feeling particularly perky, she can buy lagers at the local supermarket, get coiffed at the hair salon and play bingo as night falls. She can dip her feet into the local fountain, or even cycle into it. She lives in Hogeweyk, thought to be the world’s first “dementia village”, near Amsterdam. Dementia villages are gated communities designed for people who suffer from dementia, a term used to describe a set of symptoms (such as memory loss and confusion) that are caused by a variety of brain diseases. Hogeweyk’s 150 residents live in six-room houses, each designed around one of four “lifestyles”. These are selected for patients after tests and interviews alongside their families. Anja and her housemates live in a “traditional” home. They eat starchy stamppot stews and have a sewing machine that says it is “Made in West Germany”. Hogeweyk’s allowance of small freedoms gives peace of mind to people who have lost a part of theirs. Grouping residents by lifestyles is meant to establish continuity between their former lives and the nursing facility. Hogeweyk received over 1,400 visitors in 2017, keen to copy the concept in their own countries.

1 2 3 6