Tag : Lincolnshire

Nursing agency based in the heart of Lincolnshire

North Lincolnshire care home rated among the best in the country

A Brigg care home has been ranked in the top three per cent in the country after being rated as Outstanding by inspectors. Health watchdog the Care Quality Commission praised the Orchard Court home for the dedication of its staff and the safe environment it offers to its 29 residents. An unannounced inspection was carried out in September 2018 and the home was given the maximum overall rating of Outstanding. In their report, inspectors said staff at the home were “extremely attentive and went the extra mile to ensure people’s lives were fulfilling and meaningful”.

New Shrewsbury care home told twice to improve

A Shrewsbury care home has been told to improve twice since it opened two years ago. Montgomery House welcomed the first residents to its £8 million pound development at the end of 2016. But since then inspectors from the Care Quality Commission have found the home, which is managed by Coverage Care Services Limited, needs to improve in all areas. The home caters for older people and younger adults who may have dementia, learning disabilities or mental health needs. Inspectors reported that the 90-bed home was not always safe and there were not sufficient staff to meet people’s needs. But the owners of the home said that it is making progress while recognising that further work is needed. David Coull, chief executive of Coverage Care, said: “We invest heavily in its facilities and in staff training in order to provide the best possible friendly, caring environment as a not-for-profit organisation. We work hard to follow best care sector practice in all areas. We are pleased that this inspection has recognised the progress that has been made and we share the view that further progress is still needed. We do feel some of the issues arising from this report are subject to wider factors which have perhaps not been appreciated during the inspection.”

See us at the Lincolnshire Independent Care Conference June 7th 2018

We are proud to be supporting the Lincolnshire Independent Care Conference on Thursday June 7th. The conference will be held at Bishop Grosseteste University, Lincoln between 9.30am – 4pm. We will have a stand promoting our services to both care homes and nurses & carers. Why not come and say hello and pick up some freebies – see you there!!

Long-awaited Lincoln medical school gets go-ahead

The first Lincolnshire medical school will open thanks to a successful joint bid by the University of Lincoln and the University of Nottingham. The University of Nottingham Lincoln Medical School, on the University of Lincoln Brayford campus, will train the next generation of health professionals in an effort to fill severe staffing shortages in the region with UK-trained doctors. Funding has been secured for an initial 80 first year undergraduate places in September 2019 with a further 80 per intake in subsequent years. When it is at full capacity in a few years’ time, the new school promises to deliver medical training to around 400 undergraduate students. Students will study for a University of Nottingham BMBS medical degree and will undertake clinical placements at local hospitals, GP surgeries and other healthcare units in collaboration with United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT) and the Lincolnshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (LPFT).

Care home residents enjoy Oscars-themed party

An Oscar-themed party was a huge hit with residents at a Surrey care home. A red carpet and clicking photographer set the stage for the evening of champagne, canapes, and its own awards ceremony. The care home, Sunrise of Banstead, also organised a sit-down evening meal which was followed by the ceremony. Prizes up for grabs, included the ‘Most Glamorous Resident’, the ‘Most Fascinating Resident’ and the ‘Unsung Hero’ award. The celebrations were rounded off by a mix of swing and rock music, performed by Epsom singer Chaise Aitch. Tamara Juckes, Sunrise activities and volunteer coordinator, said: “The awards evening was a wonderful opportunity to bring together residents, team members, friends and family to celebrate Sunrise of Banstead and all those who make it such a friendly, engaging and fun place to live and work.”

Brigg care home hosts 1940’s Tea Dance for residents

Orchard Court Care Home in Brigg hosted its very own 1940’s afternoon Tea and Dance Party, with Dancing hosted by the 1940’s Swing Dancers. Plenty of food was provided and people dressed up and joined in the dancing. Shelly Riby who is the activities co-ordinator for Orchard Court said ‘We had such a great afternoon, the residents relatives and staff all joined in and there was just a great buzz about the home. Thank you to everybody who was involved’. Tracy Mussett who is the Home Manager said ‘ The afternoon was great and made even better by the fact our local community were involved.  One resident said ‘The afternoon was a great success and it was great fun’.

Nottingham Trent University named the UK’s official university of the year

Nottingham Trent University has been crowned 2017’s “university of the year” – the most coveted honour in the Times Higher Education Awards. Judges praised the institution for “combining bold ambition with the hard work and commitment required to turn vision into reality”, highlighting the university’s “impressive” record on outreach and its use of learning analytics to improve retention. It comes just two months after Nottingham Trent celebrated being named The Times and Sunday Times modern university of the year, acknowledging success in both the national students’ survey and recent league tables. Professor Edward Peck, vice-chancellor of the university, said: “This has been a phenomenal year in terms of recognition for the exceptional work of staff and students at our university.

NMC starts consultation on registration fee for nursing associates

The Nursing and Midwifery Council has launched a consultation on its proposal to charge nursing associates the same registration fee as it does for nurses and midwives. Proposals outlined in the consultation would see the cost of registration for registered nursing associates “mirror” those of their nursing and midwifery counterparts, currently £120 per year. “We are proposing the same fees for nursing associates, nurses and midwives, because the same regulatory approach will apply to the three professions, so we will need to meet the same costs,” stated the NMC in a document outling the consultation. It expected nursing associates would be subject to the “full suite” of regulation, meaning broadly the same regulatory processes that are in place for nurses and midwives would apply, said the NMC. The regulator noted that this included the requirement to maintain their registration through revalidation as well as having fitness to practise processes in place should associates fall below our standards.

Fees paid by cash-strapped councils fail to meet costs of caring for residents

Fees paid by cash-strapped councils fail to meet costs of caring for residents, according to Competition and Markets Authority. The UK’s care homes are grappling with an unsustainable £1bn-a-year funding gap caused by councils not paying enough money, resulting in many homes charging residents over the odds in order to stay afloat, an official review has found. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has also revealed it is taking enforcement action against a number of care homes that have been unfairly demanding large upfront fees, or charging families for weeks after the death of an elderly relative. In its report into the £16bn care homes sector, which covers 410,000 residents and stretches across 11,300 homes, the CMA said “urgent action” was needed because the current regime was “not sustainable” without additional funding. It suggested that people who paid for their own care were being asked to pay more than they should in order to subsidise council-funded residents. “On average, a self-funding resident is paying over £12,000 a year more than a local authority to have a place in the same care home. This difference between self-funded and local authority prices for the same service is understandably perceived by many as unfair.” The government has said it will publish a green paper on care and support for older people by summer 2018. In the meantime, however, the issue was that councils were paying fees that were “below the costs care homes incur”, said the CMA.

Nursery opens inside care home with Amazing benefits for young and old

The singing of nursery rhymes is not what you’d expect to hear in an care home for older people, but when arriving at Nightingale House in south London, you can hear the children before you can see them which is just heart warming. “Isn’t it fantastic? It’s the highlight of my week,” says 89-year-old Fay Garcia, while bouncing baby Sasha on her knee. “It’s like being reborn.” Garcia did not have her own children but is one of the regulars at the baby and toddler group. The Apples and Honey Nightingale nursery, run by founder Judith Ish-Horowicz, is the very first of its kind in the UK.

The concept of inter generational care began in 1976 in Tokyo. Since then, there have been many successful schemes across Europe, Australia and the US. The UK is still catching up with this idea, says Stephen Burke, director of United For All Ages. For over seven years, the development agency has worked with a range of organisations – including local authorities, housing providers, care homes and community centres – to encourage them to think more broadly about opportunities for combining care anywhere. Ish-Horowicz came up with her idea many years ago after bringing the children from her first nursery in Wimbledon to visit Nightingale House. The new nursery, housed in the care home’s refurbished maintenance block, has 30 places for two- to four-year-olds and even some room for the children of care home staff.

1 2 3 5