Tag : Healthcare

NHS ‘no chance of training enough staff’

The NHS in England has no chance of training enough GPs and nurses to solve the shortages it faces, experts say. A report by three leading think tanks predicts that in the next five years nurse shortages will double and GP gaps nearly treble, without radical action. The Nuffield Trust, Health Foundation and King’s Fund says a combination of international recruitment, student grants and innovation is needed. Current figures suggest there’s more than 30,000 extra nurses needed and almost 3,000 GPs. The think tanks say on current trends this will rise to nearly 70,000 nurses and more than 7,000 GPs within five years.

Loughborough named university of the year in annual list

Loughborough has been named UK university of the year alongside a set of new national rankings. The Times and Sunday Times list praised its progress in technology and science, to match its reputation for sport. The judges made the discretionary award, separate from the points-based rankings which place Loughborough fifth in the country. Nottingham was named sports university of the year and De Montfort got the first social inclusion award.Nottingham was also named international university of the year.

New tax on over-40’s being considered to fund social care

A new tax being considered by ministers as a way to fund social care could raise up to £15bn a year, according to a new report. The proposal would see a 2.5 per cent levy applied to the earnings of people over the age of 40, similar to the model used in Germany. The revenue generated by the new tax would go into a ring-fenced pot used to fund social care. Research carried out by pensions and risk consultancy Hymans Robertson suggested the German-style system could raise half of the money needed to plug the £30bn-a-year gap in social care funding the UK is facing by 2031.

A new way of caring for the elderly with dementia

Anja, who is in her 80s, says she has lived here for one hour. In fact, it has been almost a year. Like all of her neighbours, she has severe dementia. But if she is feeling particularly perky, she can buy lagers at the local supermarket, get coiffed at the hair salon and play bingo as night falls. She can dip her feet into the local fountain, or even cycle into it. She lives in Hogeweyk, thought to be the world’s first “dementia village”, near Amsterdam. Dementia villages are gated communities designed for people who suffer from dementia, a term used to describe a set of symptoms (such as memory loss and confusion) that are caused by a variety of brain diseases. Hogeweyk’s 150 residents live in six-room houses, each designed around one of four “lifestyles”. These are selected for patients after tests and interviews alongside their families. Anja and her housemates live in a “traditional” home. They eat starchy stamppot stews and have a sewing machine that says it is “Made in West Germany”. Hogeweyk’s allowance of small freedoms gives peace of mind to people who have lost a part of theirs. Grouping residents by lifestyles is meant to establish continuity between their former lives and the nursing facility. Hogeweyk received over 1,400 visitors in 2017, keen to copy the concept in their own countries.

Work begins on £8m Nottingham care home

Rayner Davies Architects and Wynbrook have started work on an £8m residential care home in Nottingham. Situated on the former Clifton Bridge Inn Silverdale, the home will include 83 beds with communal lounges, cinema and hairdresser. Project architect for Rayner Davies, Julien McGuinness, said: “The project was especially challenging due to the proximity of the A453 and the Nottingham Ring Road. Also, its location within the River Trent flood zone required the building to be elevated above the potential flood level.” The project is the fifth care home undertaken by Rayner Davies and Radcliffe based Wynbrook. Wynbrook was chosen for the project because of its high level of expertise in the sector, having recently won the ‘Best New Care Home’ category award at the 2018 Pinders Healthcare & Design Awards in London. The home is expected to take nine months to complete.

Two care home residents celebrate 100th birthdays in same week

There was a double celebration at a Derbyshire care home where two much-loved residents celebrated their 100th birthdays. Colin Frost and Frank Lowe, residents at April Park Care Home in Eckington, both reached the landmark age in the same week. The care home organised a joint party for the pair as they marked the special occasion surrounded by family and friends. A spokesperson for the care home said that Colin is a gentleman who ‘says it as it is’ and Frank is ‘very laid back’. Frank was born in Mosborough and went to school in the village. He had a number of jobs after leaving school including at Renishaw Colliery. On the outbreak of the Second World War he joined the RAF. Colin was born in Killamarsh and joined the Army in May 1938 for six years.

NEW CARE HOME OPENED NEAR NOTTINGHAM

A care home operator has opened the doors to its new £12m site near Nottingham. Ruddington Manor is New Care’s second home in the city and is located in Ruddington. The doors were officially opened by The Lord of Rushcliffe, Cllr Maureen Stockwood, and her consort Cllr Francis Purdue-Horan. The new home has 66 beds and includes en-suite wet rooms, communal lounges, dining rooms and secure landscaped gardens. It also offers a host of hotel-style services including fine dining, a hair salon, nail bar, concierge and a busy and varied programme of activities and events. New Care chief executive Chris McGoff said: “We are thrilled that the Lady Mayor was able to take time out of her busy schedule to open Ruddington Manor. We are incredibly proud of the care facility and we were delighted to give her a preview tour. The cutting of the red ribbon and meeting the first Ruddington Manor residents was a truly memorable way to mark the occasion.”

Comedian Joe Pasquale opens nightclub at Ipswich care home

A care home in Ipswich is helping residents recover their mojo by dancing the night away at a specially designed nightclub. Thornbank care home has created its very own nightclub and pub, designed for residents to spend time together reminiscing over a pint or playing traditional games. In the evening the ‘Snug’, as it is known, is transformed into a dance floor – where residents are encouraged to show off their best moves. The facilities were officially opened on Saturday, June 16 by Essex-born comedian Joe Pasquale. Lyn Andrews, activity coordinator at the home, said the pub and club had “brought fun and laughter back into our residents’ lives”.

Two Cambridgeshire doctors honoured at glitzy NHS Heroes Awards ceremony

Steven Tsui and Stephen Large work at Cambridgeshire’s Royal Papworth Hospital and have been dubbed ‘Pioneering Heroes’ at the NHS Heroes Awards. The pair made it possible to restart a beating heart allowing a new type of transplant. Their work means more people on the donor register can receive a heart, saving more lives. They are among the winners named by organisers ITV and the Mirror as part of the event celebrating 70th anniversary of the NHS. Stephen Large, consultant surgeon at Royal Papworth Hospital, said: “It is a huge honour to win this award in recognition of our work to establish DCD heart transplantation at Royal Papworth Hospital. After many years of research, I am incredibly proud of the results we have achieved so far. It is wonderful to see more than 40 people getting a second chance at life following a successful DCD transplant.” Consultant surgeon Steven Tsui added that it was a ‘real honour’ to receive the NHS Pioneering Hero award.

NMC starts consultation on registration fee for nursing associates

The Nursing and Midwifery Council has launched a consultation on its proposal to charge nursing associates the same registration fee as it does for nurses and midwives. Proposals outlined in the consultation would see the cost of registration for registered nursing associates “mirror” those of their nursing and midwifery counterparts, currently £120 per year. “We are proposing the same fees for nursing associates, nurses and midwives, because the same regulatory approach will apply to the three professions, so we will need to meet the same costs,” stated the NMC in a document outling the consultation. It expected nursing associates would be subject to the “full suite” of regulation, meaning broadly the same regulatory processes that are in place for nurses and midwives would apply, said the NMC. The regulator noted that this included the requirement to maintain their registration through revalidation as well as having fitness to practise processes in place should associates fall below our standards.

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