Tag : NHS

Removing the student nurse bursary has been a disaster

Two years on from the removal of the NHS student bursary, applications to nursing degree courses have plummeted by a third in England. Numbers applying to begin training in September 2018 have dropped 12% compared to the same time last year, resulting in a total decline of 16,580 since March 2016, the last year students received financial support through the bursary. The fall in mature student numbers has been even more extreme, with a 16% drop by the June application deadline compared to the same point last year, and a total decline of 40% since June 2016.

Janet Davies, RCN Chief Executive, said: “Failing to recruit more nurses puts patients at risk, and with 40,000 nurse vacancies in England alone, we cannot sit back and watch applications fall year on year. It is clear now that removing the bursary has been a disaster. It is time ministers looked again at this policy, before patients suffer the consequences.

NHS 10p coin launched for 70th birthday

This year the NHS turns 70 and, to mark this major milestone, The Royal Mint has launched a NHS 10p coin. The coin forms part of an A-Z of what makes Britain great with the world famous NHS being ‘N’. The NHS 10p coin is a perfect way to celebrate the birthday, reminding people about the vital role the service plays in our lives and recognising the extraordinary NHS staff – the everyday heroes – who are always there to greet, advise and care for us. Professor Jane Cummings, Chief Nursing Officer said: “As we celebrate the 70th birthday of the NHS, we are delighted to be a part of this special collection of coins, celebrating what makes Britain great. The NHS is loved and valued by the nation and we want the country to take part in this fantastic coin hunt, and recognise our dedicated NHS staff of whom we are all so proud.”

Happy birthday NHS – July 5th 2018!

The NHS will celebrate its 70th birthday this year, after a difficult decade since the global financial crisis culminating in one of the most testing years in our history. The terrorist attacks in London and Manchester, along with the Grenfell Tower tragedy, saw all emergency services, including NHS staff, respond with skill and bravery. Our health service, while still ranked among the best in the world, has never been busier. The NHS sees almost 1.5 million patients every day in England alone. So as well as celebrating its many achievements, in our landmark year we must also reaffirm our commitment to a taxpayer-funded service, based on clinical need and not the ability to pay. Happy birthday NHS – and thank you for doing such an amazing job.

Hospital corridors the new A&E

Doctors and nurses struggling to cope in stretched A&Es have begged Jeremy Hunt for more cash to solve the crisis that is leaving patients waiting in hospital corridors. But rather than calm their fears by offering a solution as the NHS goes through its worst ever winter, the Health Secretary warned them things could get even more grave. The number of casualty patients waiting more than 12 hours to be admitted reached a record level of 1,043 last month – double that of the December figure. Those waiting more than four hours to even be seen also reached a new high of 81,003. When asked if he could reassure staff things would not be worse next winter, Mr Hunt replied: “You can’t make ¬promises like that.” Mr Hunt admitted this winter was the worst for the NHS on record. But despite evidence to the contrary, including the cancellation of 55,000 routine ¬operations, he insisted “we prepared more comprehensively than ever”.

a&e

A&E waiting times axed

A&E waiting targets have been axed after NHS chiefs said Tory cuts make them impossible to keep. The drive to see 95% of patients within four hours is postponed until next April. But the NHS Confederation warned: “It will be an immense task just to stabilise the service. We repeat our call for the Government to tackle health funding.” NHS Providers Director Saffron Cordery added: “This is the first time we have had to accept that the NHS will not meet its key constitutional standards. The NHS will not be able to improve performance against those targets. If we want to provide quality of care, we need the right long term financial settlement.” The 95% target has not been met since 2015. A NHS England planning document recently released instructed hospitals to attempt to reach 90% by September 2018 and back to the benchmark of 95% in April next year. NHS England boss Simon Stevens last year warned waiting times would be scrapped due to funding.

Poole Hospital A&E named top performing in country

POOLE Hospital has been named as one of only six hospitals in the country providing emergency care better than expected by patients. Based on surveys of patients using accident and emergency services, regulator Care Quality Commission found the hospital to be among the top performing in the country. It comes just weeks after health chiefs unanimously decided Poole Hospital A&E will close and instead Royal Bournemouth Hospital will become the major emergency centre for east Dorset leaving Poole for planned care. It is part of NHS Dorset CCG’s controversial Clinical Services Review. Patients were asked a range of questions, including their overall experience of emergency departments. Respondents gave the department a rating of 8.6 out of 10 for their overall experience there. Patients also rated the service 9.3 out of 10 for being treated with dignity and respect and 8.5 for care and treatment. Geoffrey Walker, matron for emergency services at Poole Hospital, said staff are delighted. He said: “We’re a busy department seeing more and more patients, so to receive this verdict is fantastic news. We work hard on providing a service that we would be proud to offer to our own friends and family and it is extremely rewarding that patients have given us this rating. To be among the best six A&E departments in the country for patients’ overall experience is an outstanding achievement.”

NHS hospitals told to take drastic measures amid winter crisis

The NHS is reeling under what doctors’ leaders and hospital chiefs say is the most intense strain it has faced in decades as a result of flu, bad weather and more patients suffering breathing problems. Hospitals’ inability to keep up with the demand for care prompted NHS England to tell them to take unprecedented measures to try and stabilise the service. They included cancelling outpatient appointments and day case surgery, extending an existing ban on non-urgent surgery until the end of the month and deploying consultants in A&E units to assess if patients really are a medical emergency. Amid growing evidence of chaos as the NHS’s winter crisis bites, hospitals are being forced to create makeshift wards for patients, growing numbers are declaring a black alert – an official admission that they cannot cope – and patients are waiting as long as 12 hours for A&E care. Officials estimated that extending the ban on non-essential operations could lead to 55,000 procedures being deferred.

Worst nurse shortage ever

Large numbers of NHS nurses are ­quitting because of staff shortages and poor pay, it is claimed. Britain’s top nurse Janet Davies spoke out as it emerged the health service faced an “unprecedented” crisis with the number of unfilled posts doubling in three years to 40,000. It comes as new polling suggests major public concern for hospital safety with seven in ten people believing nurses are underpaid and similar numbers saying there are not enough of them. Ms Davies, general secretary of the Royal College of Nursing, said: “There is a perfect storm engulfing nursing and the stakes could scarcely be higher. After years of warnings, the nursing profession is officially shrinking. The best nurses feel forced to throw in the towel because of unprecedented staff shortages, relentless pressure and poor pay. The NHS is being dragged down by the worst nursing shortage in its history. Ministers cannot be caught idle. Experienced nursing staff are leaving in droves, not because they don’t like the job, but because they can’t afford to stay.” The NHS does not publish national data on nurse vacancies, but the RCN found 40,000 vacant posts earlier this year after freedom of information requests to trusts. That figure stood at 20,000 in 2013.

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